President Egge Shares Thoughts on Inauguration

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President Egge Shares Thoughts on Inauguration

“Inauguration” is defined as “an introduction into office,” “a ceremonial opening,” and “putting something into operation.” A new USA President is being inaugurated today, January 20, ’17. It’s a time when the country expects her chosen leader to say, in Paul’s words, “forgetting those things that are behind, I press on to lay hold of that for Christ took hold of me” (Phil. 3:12).

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Hillcrest's History Shines Torch of Christian Ed. During Dark Times in Depression

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Hillcrest's History Shines Torch of Christian Ed. During Dark Times in Depression

In 1931, the teachers agreed to keep on teaching “even without a guaranteed salary.” In the 1932-1933 school year, the teachers and administration had a total of $1,930 of salary left unpaid. In the 1933-1934 school year, they were paid less than half of their contracted salaries. They had been paid a total of $4,776.32, but $5,871 had been left unpaid. In the 1934-1935 school year, the teachers were paid a total of $5,647.40, with a total of $4,196.44 left unpaid.

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President Egge Delivers Time-tested Antidote for Lonesomeness

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President Egge Delivers Time-tested Antidote for Lonesomeness

“Why do I feel so alone when I have so many ‘friends’?” The social media context may be new, but the internal cry is the same, "I'm alone in a crowd."

Thirty-some years ago, I read a piece suggesting that our language shapes our identity. It was a period when we were incorporating technological vocabulary into self-descriptive conversation such as “networking,” “processing,” "hard-wired" and “random memory.”

The piece suggested that we would increasingly understand ourselves through mechanical robotic concepts and less in psychological terms that had been common beforoe that time.

But the most interesting point in the essay was that psychological descriptors had replaced theological concepts in our conversation.

I believe the lonesomeness of our day is not significantly different than it was decades ago, but the changes in language (influencing self-understanding) has increasingly blinded us to the solution of our loneliness.

In tech thinking, we need more connectedness. In psych terminology, we need therapy. In spiritual terms, we need God.

Knowing God is our mission at Hillcrest. The boy, Samuel, needed to lie down and listen to the Lord. In hearing the Lord's words, he became a prophet in Israel. The zealous Saul of Tarsus, had to be stopped in his ambition to excel above his peers and ask “Who are you, Lord?”

Our students, like Samuel and Saul, will be fulfilled humans when brought to oneness with God. Jesus was sent to grant us the Holy Spirt to indwell us with such intimacy that we would speak to God in familial terms, “Abba, Father!” (Galatians 4:6).

Are you feeling alone? Listen to elderly Eli’s words to young Samuel, “say, ‘Speak, Lord, your servant is listening.’” You will discover you are not alone!

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President Egge Offers Twist on Black Friday

We in the States were looking forward to relief from political advertisements only to be flooded with Black Friday ads. Both ad blitzes promised us great benefits if we responded positively.

I understand the "Black Friday"; designation has a positive history for retail accountants hoped to switch from red to black pens for their year-to- date income reports when Christmas shopping began. Years later, it became a super-sale event for shoppers. Interestingly, the term also has some negative history. The gold market crashed on this weekend, and the term was used by traffic officers trying to manage the city crowds on the (for many) Thanksgiving Friday holiday.

Money has both positive and negative results. It is a means of expressing loving generosity, which when used in harmony with the Lord’s will, actually translates to eternal treasures. On the other hand, as you know, Scripture warns that the love of money is the root of all types of evil.

But when I think about Black Friday, my thoughts go to another day when the sky turned dark, and blackness fell over the earth. It is the day we call "Good Friday." 

Red fluid flowed that day. It flowed until all sin, all moral debts, were paid in full. Coming under Jesus Christ’s sacrificial death, we are credited with His righteousness and our accounts are changed from red to black. We are given an abundant righteousness because His grace is greater than all of our sin.

As we enjoy this Thanksgiving and search Black Friday ads, remember the Lord's invitation to buy eternal life without money and price (see Isaiah 55:1-3). It is a Good Friday, after all!

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President Egge Speaks to Purpose in Tests for Spiritual Formation

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President Egge Speaks to Purpose in Tests for Spiritual Formation

“School would be wonderful if it were not for all the tests,” a student lamented. It may be a feeling many of us also experience outside of the classroom.

Permit me to take the teacher’s side and say that writing and grading a good test is also difficult.

Good test questions must target important information, central to the purpose of the class. They must distinguish between students who know the material and those who do not. However, a test may measure knowledge but not learning. Let me explain what I mean.

My Testing and Measurements college professor emphasized that learning is more than retaining information. Learning involves choices, behaviors, and attitudes. For example, if someone is taking an auto maintenance class, a test may show if a student knows how often to change engine oil, examine the tires, and check the anti-freeze. My prof said, “You will have to examine the student’s vehicle to evaluate what he/she learned.” Retaining information is knowledge. Acting on the information is learning.

At Hillcrest, we study God’s Word and give tests to evaluate the student’s knowledge. However, our instructors, residence directors, coaches, staff persons, and administrators have a greater goal. It is that students, and ourselves, love and serve the Lord God.

Melt me, mold me, Fill me, use me.
— Daniel Iverson

Jesus said His disciples will have learned when they do what He does. He washed their feet and said, “Do you understand [know] what I have done for you? … You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, … Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you should wash one another’s feet.”1 “All men will know that you are My disciples if you love one another.”2 In short, “[E]veryone who is fully trained will be like his teacher.”3 Spirit of the Living God.

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J.H. Levang Propelled Egge to Maturity As School President

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J.H. Levang Propelled Egge to Maturity As School President

Some assignments require years of home, or heart, work. President J. H. Levang assigned me one long-termer during my senior year at Hillcrest.

Hillcrest administered a standardized aptitude test to help us identify potential vocations. I received an appointment to discuss the test results with Pastor Levang when I received a copy of my test results. To be frank, I was pleased with my scores for, if I was reading it correctly, it indicated that I was very interested in several different fields. I had a lot of options, and I expected a good session with my advisor.

President Levang seated me across from himself behind his big desk and studied my profile. I don't remember what else he said during my interview except, "Joel, you have a lot of maturing to do. You should be developing strong interests in some careers and less in others.”

I need not describe how I felt when I walked out of his office. However, I will tell you that I’ve often thought about Levang’s insightful observation. It is true that I am curious about many subjects and often feel I need to focus.

James (1:8) says people who lack direction should ask the Lord otherwise they will be “double-minded and unstable in all they do.” Jesus called for us to focus. For example, “No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for service in the kingdom of God (Luke 9:62). Here is a hard statement, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters –yes, even their own life- such a person cannot be my disciple (Luke 14:26).

Paul stated, “…one thing I do: Forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus (Phil. 3:13b- 14).

In the words of one of my pastor-mentors, the lesson is: Eliminate and Concentrate. 

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Filippini Organizes Lead Research After Faith Formation at Hillcrest

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Filippini Organizes Lead Research After Faith Formation at Hillcrest

Taylor Filippini’s Hillcrest classes in physics, anatomy, and chemistry laid a basic foundation for science. She said her teachers at Hillcrest gave her an eternal perspective, and she found herself drawing closer to God. Taylor noted that her spiritual growth at Hillcrest served to highlight her academic strengths.

Wading through the confusing maze of college applications, Taylor said conversations with respected mentors like Gregg Preston and Steve Undseth calmed her searching heart. “I learned to follow God step by step and trust him to reveal my path.”

After graduating from Liberty, Taylor started work on an MBA in Healthcare Management. She wanted to be involved in meaningful work while continuing her education, so she applied for a fellowship in Duke University’s School of Medicine.

Selected as on one of five, from 150 applicants, Taylor is flexing her administrative muscles in the fellowship program. She is gaining valuable experience, specializing in grant management for federal and foundation grants, contracts, and industry clinical trials. She is working alongside doctors who are conducting groundbreaking research.

Taylor notes that miracles happen frequently in her work. One of the doctors she routinely works with performed the first hand transplant. Others are Nobel Laureates.

Taylor’s personal, volunteer, and academic experience gives her an edge in understanding medical terminology and procedures, enhancing her job managing grants and budgets that makes significant research possible.

“I am the middle man between research and funding. But I love this academic world that is constantly changing and challenging,” Taylor noted. She spoke of her Christian witness, a concept instilled in her through many mission experiences at Hillcrest. “I am in a secular environment--very different from my high school and college...People are watching.Your life is a light and witness for Jesus.”

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President Egge Remembers Formative Teacher and Highlights Unique Instruction

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President Egge Remembers Formative Teacher and Highlights Unique Instruction

Yesterday, someone asked me to describe a favorite teacher. After a quick mental scan of excellent instructors, I focused on one, Martin Holoien, and said, "He was able to communicate a concept in two lines, and he used interesting, relevant illustrations to help us understand."

Martin Holoien was remembered by students for his empathy and understanding as students worked through problems in science and life. He was noted to have a clear, ringing testimony for Jesus Christ.

Martin Holoien was remembered by students for his empathy and understanding as students worked through problems in science and life. He was noted to have a clear, ringing testimony for Jesus Christ.

Solomon wrote, “The Teacher searched to find just the right words, and what he wrote was upright and true.”

He continued, “Of making many books there is no end, and much study wearies the body.

“Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter; “Fear God and keep his commandments for this is the whole duty of man. “For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or bad.” Ecclesiastes 12:10, 12b-14.

One professional writer told me that he reworks his columns an average of 14 times to be sure his readers will understand and be moved by his words, images, and phrasing. (Sorry, I don’t.)

A good teacher invests time and thought in searching for the best words to communicate what is yet unknown to the students. I believe HLA teachers are committed to the hard work of preparation.

Secondly, an excellent teacher selects the most helpful material, from the host of available recourses, because students will wear out trying to evaluate the overwhelming amount of information in the library, not to mention the internet. Our teachers select their assigned readings with the students’ growth in mind.

Let us hear what the Teacher says, “Fear God and keep his commandments for this is the whole duty of man.”

Why?

Because God is the ultimate authority.

He will examine every deed.

The Teacher is clear and concise. With chosen words, the lesson is stated in two lines.

Pray our students will heed it. Pray that we elders will hear and embrace it.

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Accountability Check

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Accountability Check

It’s Thursday evening, and my blog is due tomorrow. I'm feeling deadline stress. I'm accountable.

But, I have a greater accountability for “Nothing in all creation is hidden from God’s sight. Everything is uncovered and laid bare before the eyes of him to whom we must give account” Hebrews 4:13).

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President Egge Shares Password

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President Egge Shares Password

Joel Egge's senior photo from the 1959 beacon.

Joel Egge's senior photo from the 1959 beacon.

I graduated Hillcrest in 1959.

Many years later, I drew from my Hillcrest experience when I had to select a password for a computer program. I entered “Romans45” It was my senior verse printed in the Hillcrest Beacon.

It seemed a perfect password because it is my password to enter heaven one day.   Romans 4.5 is, "to the one who does not work but trusts God, who justifies the ungodly, their faith is credited as righteousness.

I believed in Jesus for salvation before I came to Hillcrest as a sophomore. During my three years at Hillcrest, my faith developed something like a brick mason’s wall, one brick at a time. I can think of many student and faculty conversations that nurtured my faith, but I can’t recall one or two major events as many students do.

In fact, I don’t remember how I selected Romans 4.5 as my senior verse, but I know it was, and continues to be, a liberating message for me. It encapsulates the good news of grace that I needed at that time and every day since. Grace is undeserved gifts from God or from others.

Grace is for those who do not earn it, do not qualify, who do not deserve the blessing.
— Rev. Joel Egge

I felt unqualified and undeserving of close friendships, being on teams, and certainly, I was not deserving of Jesus Christ. These would be mine only if someone gave me these gifts. I could not earn them. I needed grace, but it was not easy for me to accept grace.

I vividly recall an experience of grace in my first year at Hillcrest. I had tried out for the traveling choir and waited for the day the traveling roster would be posted. Finally, it was. To my delight my name was on the list!  I made the choir!

But there is more to the story. Another student on the list who had traveled the previous year, was a tall, outgoing, fun-loving, senior. He was the captain of the basketball team and a quality student. His name was Wes Vall.

To my great surprise, Wes asked me to be his roommate on the choir trip. Maybe shocked is a better word than surprised. I didn’t know if could believe him, but he assured me he was serious.

I had a delightful time rooming with Wes. He was a gracious house guest, led choir devotionals,  played practical jokes on other members, and took time for Bible reading each evening. I was honored to be his roommate! After each concert, someone would read the names of the hosts and their choir guests. How neat to hear them call “Wes and Joel, you will be going with this family.”

Why Wes invited me to room with him is a question I can’t answer except that the Lord wanted me to experience grace and Wes was the Lord’s servant to give it to me.

These types of experiences made Romans 4.5 meaningful to me. Grace is for those who do not earn it, do not qualify, who do not deserve the blessing.

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President Egge Had Courage Building Experience in a Hillcrest Uniform

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President Egge Had Courage Building Experience in a Hillcrest Uniform

Coach Werdal passes out equipment to G.T. Gunhus to start the 1958 season.

“Courage is not the absence of fear, but facing one’s fear,” said Coach Werdal. 

I was in his office shortly after he had told us football players to turn in our pads if we were going to play fearfully. He said fearful players have a greater risk of injury and have a negative influence on the team’s spirit. 

I went to admit that I was often fearful. That was true in other areas in addition to messing up on the football field. That is when he described courage as facing fear, not the absence of fear. 

I have thought about Coach’s statement in many different situations these 55 years since I was on the Hillcrest team.  I occasionally think of his words as I watch our Comets on the gridiron.

We miss the best of life because of fear.  Like Adam, who admitted, “I was afraid …so I hid,” we even hide from our Creator Redeemer!

Jesus, our Savior, faced an infinitely more dangerous opponent than any football team. In facing Satan who was determined to destroy Him, Scripture says that Jesus entered the conflict by looking forward to the joy set before Him. 

Joel Egge poses for the yearbook in his senior season, 1959.

Jesus knew the suffering He would endure and the death He would experience, but He faced His future with something greater than courage. He was on God’s mission to win freedom for us being held captive by Satan, sin, and death. He looked forward to that outcome!

The joy He saw, of people like us freely enjoying God, receiving and sharing His blessings, and living with Him eternally, caused Him to “endure the cross” and “scorn its shame.”  (see Hebrews 12:2) 

My desire for you, and for our Hillcrest students, is that we face tomorrow, not with self-generated courage, but carried by the joy Jesus won for us. 

Rejoice that Lord Jesus will walk with you each tomorrow until He welcomes you into the eternal today forever captivating you with the joyous fullness of life!

Like a river glorious is God’s perfect peace, Over all victorious in its bright increase.
— Frances Havergal

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Is Hillcrest a Success?

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Is Hillcrest a Success?

Dare we say that Hillcrest is a success?

Ponder the following remarks by James M. Houston, “…[S]uccess is a public and cultural rating, whereas faithfulness to God remains hidden and divinely evaluated. … Living faithfully to Christ is in contrast with success, for it is marked by the sacrificial reality of the cross of Christ… Even the world knows the difference between a sacrificial life and a self-centered one.” (Houston, Joyful Exiles, IV Press, pg. 93)

In that awareness, we rejoice in God’s faithfulness. He is faithful to what He has promised and provided in Christ. He is faithful to His people and creation. He is faithful to His desire that all people receive life, eternal life.

Hillcrest was a gathering place for young people from scattered farms, towns, and congregations to live, grow, and serve in Jesus’ Name. We rejoice in their faithful love and service to Him. 100 years later, HLA welcomes young people from disbursed families, faiths, and nations whom the Lord gathers around Himself for the same purpose. We celebrate their embracing Christ’s atoning sacrifice and embarking on a life of following Him.

That purpose, worthy of our interest, intercession, and money is to be “marked by the sacrificial reality of the cross of Christ.” Yes, we will celebrate. We will recall Christ’s work in and through Hillcrest’s founders and all who followed them. We will rejoice in the future because Jesus will be equally faithful to HLA’s present and future students.

We are excited about the kickoff of Hillcrest’s Centennial Year during Homecoming, September 30 and October 1st .

I hope you will join in the celebration of God’s faithfulness to His promises and the resulting ten decades of blessings to the HLA community

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Centennial Sighting: Alumni Finds Purpose Through Discipline

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Centennial Sighting: Alumni Finds Purpose Through Discipline

As Hillcrest's first graduating class was preparing their final weeks at school, Tellef Senum received a note from President Broen. Senum likely sat on his bed, palms sweating with his eyes on his suitcase as he opened the letter that would give him news of his discipline. The letter was a life line that Senum used to change his actions and realize what a life of eternal significance looks like. 

Hillcrest was rounding the bend on their first of what would become 100 graduating classes as the seniors wrote their last letters home as Hillcrest students. Their wooden desks held a handful of envelopes that would carry messages of joy and excitement. Tellef Senum's desk sat bare except for a simple sheet of paper with fresh ink on it communicating disappointment and a discipline that would enable him to remain at Hillcrest.

As a sophomore, Senum likely was getting used to the freedom of life at Hillcrest. His friends were a joyous sight that often led him to exuberant activities. The staff were working to bridle the young man in an effort to guide him to maturity. While Senum bucked, the staff worked to discern if Hillcrest was the appropriate place for Senum to grow. They reached an impasse in March of Senum's sophomore year. It called the two parties to meet in mutual understanding. Senum responded marvelously. 

The letter to Tellef stated, "The faculty has decided to campus you for four weeks from date, instead of sending you home, and this gives you another chance." Senum's heart likely leapt for joy, evidenced through an attitude change that led him to the rank of class president two years later.

Senum walked across the graduation platform at the Lutheran Brethren School building in Grand Forks in 1922 to shake the hand of the man who penned the disciplinary letter two years prior. Their meeting on the stage was a marking stone that propelled Senum to great heights in proceeding years.

Senum earned his B.S. from the University of North Dakota and his Master of Science and PH.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Minnesota after receiving his Hillcrest diploma. A series of teaching stints throughout North Dakota propelled the Hillcrest graduate to Los Angeles for a director of research position for the William T. Thompson Company. He moved up the ranks to become the Executive Vice President and Director of the company in 1955. In 1960, Senum established his own firm, called the Fibertone Company, manufacturing pharmaceuticals. 

Senum's work in the field of science earned him a naming in the American Men of Science, Chemical Who's Who, Who's Who in the West, World's Who's Who in Commerce and Industry, Dictionary of International Biography, Personalities of the West and Midwest, and the Royal Blue Book (Leaders of the English Speaking World). 

In 1976 Senum orchestrated a Golden Anniversary celebration for he and his classmates. They were the first four year students to attend Hillcrest Academy. Senum compiled a book that held a letter he wrote to the administration. The letter was a preface to pictures and memorabilia the class of 1922 willingly put together for the Lutheran Brethren archives as an inspiration to future classes. Senum's letter stated, "I estimate that at our Golden anniversary our average age is about 70 years and that is not too early to prepare a review of our past 50 years and to record our thanks to God for all the good things that have happened to us. Of course, I believe the first good thing that happened to all of us was when we were born. The second good thing was when we were born again."

Senum's book will be displayed in the J.H. Levang Archive Library, a new feature that will launch at the Centennial Celebration Graduation Weekend, May 26-28, 2017. The library will highlight how God has used Hillcrest as a beacon of light to high school students for over 100 years. A place for students, like Senum, to mature and grow convinced that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, and in Him there is life. 

Front Row (L to R): Martha Kilen, Ida Goplen, Hilda Kasa, Thora Norman, Sylvia Herigstad, Almina Foss, Hannah Hektner, Christine Hektner.
Second Row: Carl Stadsklev, Mabel Foss, Nellie Vining, Hannah Giske, Clara Egge, Norma Kringen, Ingalf Torkelson.
Third Row: Helmer Lybeck, Johannah Fryhling, Emelie Johnson, Gladys Westley, Norman Nelson.
Back Row: Clarence Walstad, Tellef Senum, Bersven Blikstad
Not Pictured: Ruth Bridston, Edna Randall, Iva Benson.

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Gunhus Shared Resolve After Foxhole Conversation

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Gunhus Shared Resolve After Foxhole Conversation

G.T. Gunhus enrolled at Hillcrest in 1957. His experience parallels a foxhole conversation that put him on a unique trajectory to be used by God.

G.T. Gunhus poses in his football gear for a yearbook photo in 1957.

G.T. Gunhus poses in his football gear for a yearbook photo in 1957.

In 1957, Gunhus found himself in a Comet uniform with a beat up helmet hugging his ears. The equipment was worn. Augsburg college discarded the worn helmets, and Hillcrest's year-old football program quickly picked them up. 

Being only the second year Hillcrest fielded a football team, most in the area felt the Comets would be easy pickings for a pad to stats and a tally in the win column. But with Gunhus' athleticism and football I.Q., the Comets played spoiler throughout the year. 

Dust rolled off the wheels as the Comet bus came to a jolted stop in Campbell, Minnesota for one of the many spoiler games. Campbell scheduled the Comets for homecoming. Fans stood in silent protest as the Comets made quick work of the established football program. Gunhus and his teammates unstrapped their gear as they grabbed water bottles for halftime, smiling. The Comets were spoiling homecoming with the scoreboard blaring their 34-0 score. "Not a team could beat us," Gunhus recalled. 

Jumping into a football program picking up speed, Gunhus' Hillcrest experience would provide context for a future battle. He joined the Vietnam war at the height of combat. Having the experience of jumping in to contribute to Hillcrest's football program, Gunhus had a knack for catching up with a pace. His role as Army Chaplain would take him to a difficult place and greatly shape his life.

Gunhus' green-stained army bag hit the ground with a thud at a base camp at Phu Loi, Vietnam in 1968. The entire first month brought Gunhus face-to-face with an ominous fear. “I was afraid I was going to die.”

His fear heated to a boiling point when Viet Cong guerrillas attacked the Phu Loi Camp on October 12. Rocket and mortar fire blared as he crouched in a deep bunker under the cover of night. The sandbags provided little security as the ground shook and awoke Gunhus' fear. “I had to come to grips with my calling,” Gunhus recalled. The faces of his wife Ann, and two small boys, Kevin (age four at the time) and Michael (6 months old), ran through his mind as mortar shells exploded around him. He reminisced that the strongest picture was the “image of a family without a dad and husband.” He remembered thinking, “I didn’t sign up for any of this.”

Then, the Lord spoke. “Do you trust me to keep you alive?”

Gunhus responded: “Yes, by your Grace.”

“If I allow you to die, do you trust me to take care of your family?” God asked.

Again, Gunhus replied, more slowly: “Yes, by your Grace.”

It was in that night that Gunhus' call to military service was reinforced. He recalls his soul centering on a passage from John, chapter 15, verse 16. “You did not choose me, but I chose you.”  At that point, Gunhus realized that he was God’s servant, and his response was to say, “Lord, send me where you want me to go.”

Later in his career Gunhus would counsel hundreds of men in difficult times. He supported many in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, where he was the Chief Chaplain for the U.S. Army as a four-star general. His office was obliterated when the terrorists flew a plane into the Pentagon. Gunhus was on vacation at the time. In coming back to the office, Gunhus resolved to build a chapel where terrorists crashed a plane that left the Pentagon charred. He led the effort in building the chapel, a place many have found solace.

More of G.T. Gunhus' story is told in Hillcrest's Centennial book, written by historian Steve Hoffbeck, set to release at the Hillcrest Invitational Tournament, April 7-8 2017. This Centennial highlight is a glimpse into how God uses experiences at Hillcrest to prepare followers to be a beacon of light in a darkened world.

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President Egge Sees Purpose in Hillcrest's Halls

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President Egge Sees Purpose in Hillcrest's Halls

“See, I will send you the prophet Elijah before that great and dreadful day of the Lord comes. He will turn the hearts of the fathers to their children, and the hearts of the children to their fathers; or else I will come and strike the land with a curse” (Malachi 4:5-6) is a favorite promise.  

  • I like God’s promise to launch a rescue operation before launching a destructive force against an evil society.

  • I like the fact that it is the Lord who initiates the promise and pledges to fulfill it.

  • I like the picture of adult hearts being filled with compassion for younger persons and younger people loving older ones.

It is a promise of community and interdependent encouragement like God originally created and which He is recreating in Christ Jesus.

When the Lord’s angel told elderly and childless Zechariah that he and his Elizabeth were going to receive a son, the angel said, “Many of the people of Israel will he bring back to the Lord their God. And he will go on before the Lord, in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous-to make ready a people prepared for the Lord” (Luke 1:16-17).

This is a profound description of the Lord’s work among people, including the Hillcrest community. He is daily opening the hearts of younger and older people, so lost persons are united with God in Jesus Christ, and thus united to each other.

You, parents, friends, and prayer/financial partners are critical members of this mission! Thank you and Glory be to God.

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Centennial Sightings

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Centennial Sightings

E.M. Broen became president of the Lutheran Brethren Bible School in 1903. Broen would later become a driving force in the creation of the high school department in 1916. Through the start of the Bible school it is clear to see the mission heart that would later be a driving force in Hillcrest Academy. 

In Broen's early years with the Church of the Lutheran Brethren, good friend, Pastor K.B. Birkeland, was influential as the two took on the primary teaching of the Bible school department at the turn of the century. It was often that Broen was asked if he, “would consider a call . . . to go to India.” Birkeland could see a mission itch in Broen's spirit.

Professor E.M. Broen sits third from the left. Future Chinese missionary, Marie Harstad, stands first from the left in the second row. This is the student body for the Lutheran Brethren Bible School 1903-04

Professor E.M. Broen sits third from the left. Future Chinese missionary, Marie Harstad, stands first from the left in the second row. This is the student body for the Lutheran Brethren Bible School 1903-04

Broen liked the Lutheran Brethren because he saw it as a “mission synod.” In 1902 the synod sent their first missionaries to China, who would pioneer a vital, indigenous church in the Hupeh and Honan provinces. Areas unreached by Christian missionaries before their endeavor.

From his first days walking the halls at the school's Wahpeton campus, Broen communicated his mission heart. In his first class in 1903 a young woman named Marie Harstad sat impressionable and eager to learn more of the Lord. Her Bible School education would change her life, and propel her to change many others after graduation. 

Marie placed trust in Jesus at an early age. Thinking back to her pig-tails and skipping, Harstad noted that her faith matured in a special writing where she declared, "when God saved me . . . . He also called me to China.” Her missionary heart was deliberately hidden as Harstad matured. 

While prayers for China continued, a new song came from Harstad's mouth as she sought further training in a faith that compelled her to mission work. She started praying that a Bible School would be established near her home. As the Church of the Lutheran Brethren answered the call of synod leaders to start what would later merge into Hillcrest Academy, Harstad's prayers were answered, preparing a young woman for overseas mission to an unreached people group.

Harstad's early days as a Bible school student were filled with butterflies as she found herself in a surreal experience. Her answer to prayer through the Lutheran Brethren Bible School was deeper than her prepubescent prayers near her farmhouse window every night. Harstad sat in Broen's class. The missionary was preparing the mission-minded.

As the class exited their introductory material, Harstad wrote of her instructors' incredible passion for things of the Lord. She wrote in one entry explaining, “one of Broen’s outstanding subjects was missions and mission history. His whole heart was in that subject and lots of times God’s presence was felt so strongly that the tears rolled down our cheeks." Marie epitomized the experience by simply stating, “At times I thought I was more in Heaven than on earth.”

Harstad's experience in Broen's class kindled a flame for missions that she worked to keep hidden in her early years. She writes, “Broen spoke often of the mission field, and wished he could go there.” She commented in her journal that, “the whole class seemed to catch the mission spirit.”

Following graduation, the impression Broen had on his pupils translated into life-changing action. In a time before China Inland Mission's call in the 1920s for 200 missionaries to pack their belongins in coffins to serve the Lord in China, Marie traveled to China in 1906 in a proverbial trailblazing event. The Lutheran Brethren sent six students to China before the world was called to action. The six students were members of the first three classes of the Bible School, what would later grow into Hillcrest Academy.

The mission heart of Hillcrest predates a worldwide mission emphasis. This heart serves as primary roots that establish Hillcrest as a place for students to not only affirm the faith, but to equip students to exercise their faith in eternally significant actions.

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President Egge Speaks to Uniqueness of Hillcrest Experience

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President Egge Speaks to Uniqueness of Hillcrest Experience

How should we think of Christian Education? Many people have offered answers. Here is another. It is worth your consideration (for your own thinking) and may well be a foundational concept for schools like Hillcrest.

Drawing from Psalm 1, being “schooled” in God’s Word is life-producing (for oneself) and life-sharing (for others). Like trees planted by streams of water, persons drinking God’s truth flourish and bear fruit. People nourished in God’s Word thrive when others wilt; when their leaves wither. The dry seasons do not destroy them.

Second, people who are growing in God’s grace and truth bear fruit. “The example of God’s prophets and apostles shows that they did not keep their education in the wisdom of God’s Law and Gospel to themselves. As per God’s calling -and warning- they proclaimed God’s wisdom for the salvation of others.” 

This is opening week at Hillcrest. I am enjoying the buzz between classes, the sounds of a full chapel, the cheers from the sports teams, and the melodies from the music wing. Students, some returning and many new, have come because a huge number of people these last 100 years have seen the importance of young people being planted next to the stream of the Word of the Lord.

Your desire, along with mine, is that God will plant these precious young people in His Word with the result He will be their source of life bearing fruit for God’s glory and the blessing of families, congregations, and communities in all parts of the world.

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Alumna Returns Home to Hillcrest

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Alumna Returns Home to Hillcrest

“Hillcrest became like my family,” said Nhi softly. “The other school told me about Jesus but didn’t bring me to Him.” The lifestyle of HLA’s teachers and staff, the interest they took in not only teaching her subjects but investing in her life and budding faith, were irresistible. Nhi, who grew up in a Buddhist community in Vietnam, came to faith in Jesus Christ at Hillcrest. She went from her small family of four to the burgeoning Family of God winning the love and respect of more “siblings” than she can count.

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