Hillcrest's staff met this week to pray over the upcoming school year. Before their prayer they heard a statement. If God made the entire universe, then the entire universe speaks to the fact that God made it. And if the entire universe speaks to the fact that God made it, then God is the most important thing in the entire universe.

After the statement something drastic happened that turned the tables on the meeting. The leader posed the same statement with something not often heard, but often taught. You make the entire universe.

Few have thought through what a Godless education really teaches students. If God isn't the creator of the universe, something must take his place. This is the fundamental entry point of differing worldviews. A person's view of God determines their actions and ultimately their freedom. 

In most modern schools students are taught that they create the universe. Because God has been removed from curriculum, many public schools replace God with man's study, research, and theories. Neil DeGrasse Tyson, famous scientist and host of the remade Cosmos series, recently noted that the universe is a construct we create. We identify and organize laws in the universe to speak to what is happening. So essentially, the statement our staff heard this week is turned on its head in public schools, and the statement follows logically with insightful consequences.

If man creates the entire universe, then the entire universe speaks to the fact that man creates it. This statement is fairly evident in education. Pull in any public school text book and you will see that man has created a world that doesn't need God. The entire universe, students in public schools learn, is understandable from logic and reason defined by humans. The next statement is insightful.

If the entire universe speaks to the fact that man makes it, then man is the most important thing in the entire universe. Because man determines the universe, the universe, through the eyes of the man, reflects his image. This is the root of the culture and social battles students face every day, and it is incredibly burdensome.

There is a weight the secular world unwittingly casts on students. Students are taught to make their world. When a student has a feeling in their sexual identity, they are instructed to build their sexual world. When a student is in school, all their ideas are valid as long as those ideas don't infringe on someone else's construct of their own world. What follows is an imprisoning perspective that weighs on students navigating the world.

Essentially, if everyone is building the world in their mind, then people are forced into thought ghettos. Students identify and rally around similar ideas of reality. Dialog and discourse are hard to come by. There is no foundation.

Challenging someone else's view of the world is essentially saying they are not the most important thing in the universe. A challenge is seen as exerting a reality that people must adhere to. And in the secular world, exerting that force places the exerter in a position of authority, something like a god, that has established mores for society to live by. God is not welcome in the secular world. Therefore challenging thoughts are unwanted, because they call for some higher standard that organizes the world. Students in secular schools have it rough, logically.

To rebuild the universe it's our belief that students need to ask if God made the Universe. Something designed the universe. We don't look at Mount Rushmore and marvel at the natural forces of wind, rain, and erosion. History says that someone made Mount Rushmore. There are plans and thoughts that went into crafting the heads of four presidents of the United States into rock. Knowing this reality should cause man to say that if something looks organized there is likely an organizer behind it.

The universe looks organized. So if the universe looks organized it is likely because there is an organizer who is displaying qualities of organization. Essentially, the universe speaks to the fact that an ultimate organizer made it. 

If the universe speaks to the fact that an ultimate organizer made it the role of education shouldn't be about creating a construct for oneself. The role of education is to explore this organizer. 

At Hillcrest we welcome both Biblically-based and secular thought. Not all of our students have a saving faith in Jesus. Not all of our textbooks share a Biblical view. However, through dialog, logic, and reason we test the ideas in textbooks and the Biblical view. Students wrestle with big questions, constantly assessing if the Bible is really consistent with reality, coherent (understandable), and complete. On the flip side, students also wrestle with man's ideas asking the same questions. What students are left with is answering a question of who is god.

If God really made the entire universe, then the entire universe speaks to the fact that God made it. And if the entire universe speaks to the fact that God made it, then God is the most important thing in the entire universe. Replacing that statement with man leaves the world filled with millions of conflicting realities. Replacing that statement with God frees man to live in a world that has been made for man to know, study, and discover God. This simple 3 step thought process rebuilds a universe for students to receive ultimate freedom. 

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